Astrophysics (index)

Moon

(Earth's natural satellite)

A Moon is a natural satellite of a planet.

More specifically, the Earth's natural satellite is called the Moon. Tidal Locking keeps the same face to the Earth, and it rotates roughly perpendicular to the Ecliptic, so its poles have shadows that receive no light from the Sun. Places cold enough to keep water Ice frozen are called Lunar Cold Traps.

Current theory on the origin of the moon favors the Giant Impact Hypothesis, that the moon coalesced from orbiting debris from an impact between Earth and a Mars-sized planet.


(moon,object,object type)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon
RedshiftParsecs
/Distance
Lightyears
/Lookback Years
  
~0384399km~0lyMoon

Referenced by:
Abundances
Aerosols
Albedo
Arecibo Occultation Survey (AO)
Apparent Magnitude (m)
Astronomical Quantities
Atmosphere
Astronomical Unit (AU)
Barycenter
Basalt
Bathymetry
Callisto
Cassini
Chemical Equilibrium (CE)
Celestial Mechanics
Methane (CH4)
Circumplanetary Disk
Circular Polarization Ratio (CPR)
Cryovolcano
Carl Sagan Institute (CSI)
Double Transit
Dynamo
Earthshine
Eccentricity (e)
Enceladus
Enceladus Life Finder (ELF)
Europa
Europa Clipper
Exosatellite
Galileo
Ganymede
General Circulation Model (GCM)
Geochemistry
Gravity
Hadley Cell
Hill Radius
Hydrology
In Situ
Io
JUICE
Kozai Mechanism
Lagrangian Point
LCROSS
Libration
Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO)
Mass Spectrometer
Ammonia (NH3)
Obliquity
Occultation Observations
Orbital Inclination
Orbital Resonance
Orbital Speed
Phase Curve
Planet Formation
Planetoid
Precession
Radar
Rayleigh Scattering
Reduced Mass
Roche Limit
SELENE
Shepherd Moon
Standard Gravitational Parameter (μ)
Tidal Force
Tidal Locking
Titan
TiNy Titans (TNT)
Transit
Transmission Spectroscopy

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